Where to Sit Down


Where to Sit Down


Place cards identify the places people are to sit; they are used to eliminate confusion when more than six people dine together. Place cards usually designate individual places at formal affairs. If there are no place cards, the hostess tells the dinners which seat to take or requests that they determine their own places.
The hostess is the last to enter the room at a formal dinner with the other women sitting down without waiting for her. The women sit before or after the hostess is seated at an informal meal.



The place of honor at the table is to the right side of the host because most people are right-handed. Men help seat the woman seated on his right then sits. A host helps the lady seated to his right. The hostess is assisted by the man to her left. To make the process easier, women should approach their chairs from the right.


Unless protocol is being observed, other guests should not be seated according to their importance.
Seating should as much as possible be man-woman, man-woman. Mix young and old as much as conviviality and tact allow. Beyond these few guidelines, guests should be arranged in the way that the host feels will be most congenial for conversation. Husbands and wives are not usully seated together when all the women are seated, the men sit down.


In a private residence the hostess should suggest where to leave a purse, purses should not be brought to the table. In a restaurant or public place it is held on the lap or placed close at hand.